Cat Friendly Veterinarians

Following on from my previous post on environmental enrichment for New Zealand cats, this post will focus on some things veterinarians can do to improve the lives of their feline patients.

There are many ways we can increase the number of positive experiences pet cats have. Not least is helping to ensure their experiences when visiting a veterinary clinic are less negative, and more positive [1, 2]. This is where individual veterinarians and clinics come in. If a cat is not ‘happy’ about going to the clinic, then an owner is less likely to bring their pet to the veterinarian as often as they may otherwise [3, 4]. Feline environmental enrichment is not just good for the cat; it is good business.

How can we treat our cat patients with kindness? (and differently to dogs)

Cat are not just mini dogs. They respond very differently towards veterinary consultations. From the cat that refuses to leave its carrier, to the one who refuses to go back in; the cat who stiffens up and tries to draw blood, to the one who just wants to rub its face all over you. We know there are many differences even between cats. However, there are a few things we can do to make life a little easier for those that are struggling with going to see a veterinarian.

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Cat carrier training

For starters, training cats to not completely hate the idea of going in their cat carrier can make life much easier for everyone. This is something that owners will need to work on at home, but as veterinary professionals we can help pick up on these problems and guide owners in the right direction. If a cat is not apparently ‘happy’ about going in a carrier, then an owner is probably going to think twice about bringing ‘Fluffy’ in to get that cough looked at. This can be bad for the cat, and bad for business.

Dr Sarah Ellis (@sarahlhellis) has written an excellent blog post on Katzenworld about how to train cats to like their carrier. The post starts off with some tips about what makes a good cat carrier and then goes through how to counter-condition cats to their own carrier. It would be a great post for veterinary professionals to be familiar with and then make owners aware of. A veterinarian could quite easily have a chat to an owner about carrier training if they mention having troubles, or if the cat is clearly not happy about going back in at the end of a consultation. It could even just be something we casually ask, for example ‘How does fluffy like her carrier?’.

I was in a pet store recently (acquiring more toys for my spoilt felines) and happened to be walking past a couple who were looking at cat carriers. They were complaining about their cat not liking the one they already own. They saw the cat toys I had and (guessing I had a menagerie) asked me which one I used for my cats. As a busy-body (and cat enthusiast) I could not help but ask them if they had ever heard of cat carrier training. They had not and were very interested to hear about it. I gave them the link and they (happily) trotted off to have a read.

Cat friendly veterinary practices

Veterinarians and clinics with cat friendly approaches can also get involved in feline environmental enrichment. Once cats arrive at the clinic, in the carrier they have now learnt to like, it is up to us to make that experience as positive as possible. Not only do we want them to come back, but we also want to tip the balance of their possible experiences towards the positive side as much as possible [1, 2] – if we are aiming to be the animal welfare advocates that the New Zealand Veterinary Council would like us to be.

Low stress handling techniques and clinic design can have a massive impact on the experiences of our feline patients. Many clinics could be re-designed with feline patients in mind (e.g. separate dog and cat waiting areas, separate consulting rooms, and separate hospitalisation areas with each species comfort in mind), but there are also simple cost-effective ways of providing for our feline patients. Cats do not respond well to aggressive handling techniques. How many veterinarians or veterinary nurses have ‘lost’ a cat after pushing it too far? It makes it very difficult to work with them in the future – and the owners are never very impressed. The International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) recognise this and have written an excellent article [5] in The Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery about feline-friendly handling guidelines.

The ISFM are also responsible for the worldwide Cat Friendly Clinic programme, designed to increase the number of cat friendly veterinary clinics by providing free information – to enable clinics to work towards a voluntary accreditation scheme. The importance of handling cats in clinics is emphasised by this scheme. Once accredited, veterinary clinics can advertise this accreditation to cat owners and are then eligible to be listed on the ISFM website. Veterinarians and clinics can register their interest for free to receive more information about this accreditation scheme.

In addition to all these differences in the ways we treat our feline patients, there are some things we can do for them that we are already doing for dogs. Providing yummy cat friendly treats in consult rooms can be used to reinforce any positive experiences and counter-condition pets to the veterinary clinic [6]. If it makes it easier to examine an overweight cat after a few treats are given, then this is probably going to do more good than potential harm – so long as we are clear with the owner why we are doing it in this instance. Giving cats a little more time, once out of their carrier, to acclimatise themselves to the room (as we so often allow for in dogs) is also likely to help the consult go smoothly.

These are just a few of the ways that, as veterinarians, we can improve the lives of our feline patients – at least during the time that we have some control over their experiences. Enriching the lives of cats is not just good for them; it is also good for us.

References

  1. Green, T.C. and D.J. Mellor, Extending ideas about animal welfare assessment to include ‘quality of life’ and related concepts. New Zealand Veterinary Journal, 2011. 59(6): p. 263-71.
  2. Yeates, J.W. and D.C.J. Main, Assessment of positive welfare: A review. Veterinary Journal, 2008. 175(3): p. 293-300.
  3. McMillan, F.D., Maximizing quality of life in ill animals. Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2003. 39(3): p. 227-235.
  4. Vogt, A.H., et al., AAFP-AAHA feline life stage guidelines. Journal of feline medicine and surgery, 2010. 12(1): p. 43-54.
  5. Rodan, I., et al., AAFP and ISFM Feline-Friendly Handling Guidelines. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2011. 13(5): p. 364-375.
  6. Westlund, K., To feed or not to feed: Counterconditioning in the veterinary clinic. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 2015. 10(15): p. 433-437.
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Studying for an ANZCVS Membership Examination

Are you a registered veterinarian working in New Zealand or Australia who wants an extra challenge? Do you have a particular subject area that interests you and makes you want to learn more? And/or do you just want a few extra letters after your name? You might want to consider sitting an examination for Membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS). This is something I am currently working towards, and I just wanted to share what I have learnt so far about the Membership process.

Disclaimer: This post is designed to increase awareness of veterinary membership examinations and therefore gives details of the process from the author’s perspective. The author is in no way affiliated with the ANZCVS and details of the examination process may change – you should check out the ANZCVS website and Candidate Handbook for official information.

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Malibu helping me study the Five Domains Model

Eligibility

First things first, who can sit the exams? There are a few basic requirements, namely that you:

  1. Are eligible to be registered as a veterinarian in New Zealand or Australia and;
  2. Graduated at least 3.5 years before taking an exam.

This is fairly standard across the board. On the Application Form, they also ask you to provide your curriculum vitae and emphasise “the extent of your experience in the area in which you are applying for examination”. It does mention on the Membership Page that you should have spent at least 4 years in a full-time ‘veterinary activity’ between graduating and sitting the exam. So this is something to think about.

At this point it is also a good idea to check out the individual Subject Guidelines for additional requirements.

Choosing a Subject

So which subject are you going to sit your Membership examination in? There are a lot to choose from! They are currently divided into three categories:

  • Category 1 are the subjects that are examined every year. These are the big four of: Small Animal Medicine, Small Animal Surgery, Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, and Veterinary Radiology (Small Animal)
  • Category 2 are examined every second year – you will need to find out when exactly. The ‘Membership Examination 2017’ offerings are available now.
  • Category 3 are no longer offered, but have been at some point in the past

When you are choosing a subject, it is a good idea to read the individual Subject Guidelines for the areas you are interested in. They tend to list the learning outcomes for the particular subject and give a list of recommended reading. Although this list is not exhaustive, it will give you a pretty good idea of what you will be studying.

It is fairly important to be interested in the study area!

Practicalities of the Examinations: where, when, and how much?

Again, check out the ‘Membership Examinations 2017’ on the website for 2017 dates and fees.

How much does it cost? The 2017 examination fee is set at A$1,323. This does not include your flights and accommodation to sit the oral and/or practical examination(s) on the Gold Coast in Australia.

Where and when do I sit it? The written examinations are sat in June and are available at various testing locations throughout New Zealand and Australia. However, the oral and/or practical examination(s) are held in June/July on the Gold Coast in Australia – it is coupled with the College Science Week.

Find out More

I have tried to hyperlink the relevant areas throughout this post, but I still recommend you:

  • Visit the ANZCVS website, which has information on the Membership Page
  • Check out the Candidate Handbook for more details
  • Read up on the Subject Guidelines and Chapter overviews
  • Think about it!
  • Apply – applications have to be in early (31st October in the year before your exam)!
  • Find a mentor (more about this in the Candidate Handbook) and download Sample Examination Papers
  • Talk to people! I cannot over-stress the importance of this. As I mentioned, the subject guidelines are not exhaustive and may be a little overwhelming. I highly recommend finding someone that has successfully sat the same examination so that you can pick their brain for tips and tricks.

I have found going to veterinary conferences (e.g. AVA, NZVA, and College Science Week) really helpful. There’s tonnes of awesome people to meet and a lot of good study material is presented in the relevant stream(s) for your subject. You could even meet your examiners there!

That is probably enough information to get you started. If you have any comments or questions, please get in touch.